What’s killing the sharks of the Persian Gulf? (2022)

What’s killing the sharks of the Persian Gulf? (1)
by Kathy Xu

What comes to mind when thinking about Iran or the Middle East? War-torn? Deserts? Oil? Islamic state? Persian carpets? Perhaps the Iraq-Iran War?

Sharks are most likely not among your first thoughts. Yet, sharks can be commonly spotted along the waters of the Persian Gulf—or at least they used to be. Sandwiched between Iraq and on the west border, and Turkmenistan, Afghanistan, and Pakistan in the east, Iran is blessed with the deep waters of the Caspian Sea to the north, and the Persian Gulf down south.

Sharks in the Persian Gulf?

What’s killing the sharks of the Persian Gulf? (2)

The coast of the Persian Gulf stretches over 2,700 kilometres of continental coastline and covers an expansive 156,000 square kilometres of Iran's Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ)—an area of the water that can be used for economic activities like fishing and drilling. Since 1988, Iran started reporting shark landings on the coast to the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the UN, amongst other fishery statistics. Who would have thought that Iran has a decades-long culture and tradition of shark fishing and is one of the top shark fishing nations in the world? Yet, data on the numbers and types of sharks caught remain scarce.

What’s killing the sharks of the Persian Gulf? (3)
(Video) BBC NEWS SAS iranian Embassy Siege 80s op nimrod

What type of sharks can be found in the Persian Gulf?

The Persian Gulf, due to its semi-enclosed nature, is blessed with deep waters as well as extensive reefs. Its connection to the Indian Ocean also makes it rich with migratory and non-migratory sharks alike. It connects with the Arabian Sea through the Strait of Hormuz and the Gulf of Oman. Its warm and shallow waters hosts several coral reefs, mangroves, and seagrass beds. Several Middle Eastern countries such as Iraq, Kuwait, Iran, Oman, United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia, and Qatar share the coastline of the Persian Gulf. Some shark species found in the Persian Gulf include bigger sharks like the Tiger sharks and Bull sharks - which can grow up to four metres long; and the smaller species such as the spot tail and blacktip sharks.

What’s killing the sharks of the Persian Gulf? (4)

Have Iranian coast sharks been dangerous to humans?

Just how scary and dangerous are sharks to humans really? One is all too familiar with the iconic and timeless movie of the 70s, Jaws, and the result of its influence on people’s one-sided perception of sharks (one that is more often than not, unkind to sharks).

What’s killing the sharks of the Persian Gulf? (5)
(Video) GRAPHIC: Shark eats seal right in front of Atlantic White Shark Conservancy research team

Sharks have been essentialised by the portrayal of the Great White—are all sharks really just out to attack unsuspecting human beings, as portrayed in Jaws? Peter Benchley, the author of the 1974 novel that the movie originated from, later expressed regret about his work after he learnt about the plight of sharks and the rate they were being killed. He committed his life to ocean conservation thereafter.

It is important to look at the actual history of shark attack statistics in the world to have a better understanding of just how dangerous sharks are. First of all, shark attacks on humans are classified under two categories—provoked and unprovoked. There are only about five known species of sharks that have recorded aggressive behaviour towards humans before in history. Yet, the grand total of human deaths that have resulted from shark attacks in the 84 global unprovoked attacks on humans by sharks in the year 2016 alone, stands at four. It seems that in the 1940s, shark attacks were so common in the Persian Gulf that a website was created to track shark attacks on humans. Since 1921, there has been a total of 27 shark attacks (mostly by Bull sharks). That is 27 shark attacks in 64 years, which does not even average out to one shark attack on humans per year. Moreover, the last known attack in Iran was in 1985—two decades ago.

What’s killing the sharks of the Persian Gulf? (6)

Who are catching the sharks? How, and why?

Despite the Persian Gulf’s richness of shark species variety, sharks are still getting caught in fisheries along the coast, especially by trawling and gillnet by artisanal fishermen. In Iran alone, shark are considered to be non-Halal and are hence not eaten by the locals. Sharks are caught as by-catch and sold as primarily as exports. Not enough data is available on the magnitude of the catches, although up to 37 species of sharks have been recorded to be seen at the landing sites.

In fact, the decline of sharks in the Persian Gulf actually started in the late 1970s, although the numbers of rays, catfish and grunts, mostly bottom dwelling marine life, have interestingly, increased.

As the Asian demand for shark products, especially shark fins, started to increase from the 1980s due to rising affluence, there was no species specific data collected to track changes in shark populations and to implement proper catch management from the catches. The catch and trade of sharks from the Arabian waters remain mostly unregulated and unmonitored. There is little available information about the species caught and its impact on the regions around where they could be found. In 2008, Saudi Arabia claimed to have banned shark fishing but its fins were still showing up in Hong Kong. In 2010, the Maldives banned shark fishing, while Yemen still has no laws protecting sharks to date, and Somalia has laws but no means of enforcement due to lack of data. Currently, the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and Yemen are two of the top 15 major exporters of shark fin to Hong Kong.

Existing data on shark catches is mostly limited to shark products coming from UAE and Oman. Shark species were identified through biological identification. It showed 45.3 percent of the species traded were thought to be at global risk of extinction.

UAE primarily exports shark fins to Hong Kong, amounting around 500 tons per annum (around 454,000 kilograms) between 1998 and 2000. Yemen is an important transhipment hub where fins are brought to be re-exported. Dried shark fins are also sold at fish markets in UAE, with prices ranging from US$25 per kg for small fins to US$100per kg for guitarfish fins. Hong Kong, China, South Korea and Singapore are countries that are still importing dried shark fins directly from the Middle East.

(Video) What is killing #FinlessPorpoises?

How does the Middle East weigh up with the rest of the world in marine protection?

Only two to three percent of the Middle East’s territorial waters are marine protected areas, as opposed to 16 percent in East Asia and the Pacific. Despite so, Iran already has a ban on shark fishing since 2014, while bans have not come into effect in Southeast Asia as quickly at all. Not a single Southeast Asian country is on the list of countries that have banned shark fishing completely (with the exception of Raja Ampat in Indonesia where shark fishing has been banned since 2010) or enacted similar laws in some way. However, the UAE, Bahrain, and Qatar do give protection to the threatened sawfish, and the whale shark is not allowed to be fished in countries like Indonesia and Philippines. All the same, marine protected areas have problems with enforcement of protection, just like shark fishing ban enforcements.

But so what?

Missing information means increasing need for shark data collection through citizen science and mass involvement.

Even though Iran has officially banned the fishing of sharks in 2014 by Iran’s Department of Environment, enforcement is still the hardest part. With insufficient funds and lack of regulation on the enforcing the ban, shark fishing continues, mostly as bycatch. Without actual species specific data of shark fisheries and their catches in the Middle East, enforcement will remain a challenge. UAE based marine researcher, Rima Jabado, works at getting precious data about sharks and rays in the Middle East through her own efforts on the ground as well as through crowdsourced citizen science data collection obtained from the general public, the Gulf Elasmo Project. Anyone can submit their photos and information taken on dives, landing sites or shark markets, about sharks—dead or alive—to aid in research and data collection for change. This proves that conservation efforts is not just limited to marine scientists or conservationists—the public have a stake in it as well.

There is another silver lining—the rare and threatened adult smoothtooth blacktip sharks (Carcharhinus leiodon) have been sighted in the Persian Gulf throughout the year. According to a 2013 research, four to six pup births are recorded each year in spring and summer. New species of sharks are also being identified by scientists with populations of sharks in the Gulf likely being higher than thought, according to studies. Whether current efforts will have far reaching positive consequences to the health of shark populations in the Arabian waters, or a case of being too little too late, remains an uncertainty.

Disclaimer: Our stories have been researched and fact-checked to the best of our abilities. Should you spot mistakes, inaccuracies, or have queries about our sources, please drop us an e-mail at hello@kontinentalist.com

#food #sustainability #wildlife #conservation #west_asia
(Video) Nomads of the Gulf, Guardians of the Sea, Friends of the Fishermen
Kathy Xu / Writer Kathy used to write marine and environmental stories at Kontinentalist. She was history-trained but does other things now instead, like running an ecotourism shark conservation business, The Dorsal Effect. When free, she enjoys being in the ocean, trying to spot some sharks or just home cuddling with her cavvie, Danea.

Credits

Illustration / Adeline Kuswanto

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What’s killing the sharks of the Persian Gulf? (13)

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FAQs

Is there any sharks in Persian Gulf? ›

More than 60 species of sharks are recorded in the waters of the Persian Gulf and the Sea of ​​Oman. Statistics show that Iran is one of the countries that has suffered the most damage from shark attacks on people and divers.

Are there great white sharks in the Persian Gulf? ›

There are no Great White Sharks in the Persian Gulf, and shark attacks in general are extremely rare.

Is it true that most shark attacks occur in 3 feet of water Jaws? ›

Most attacks on divers have happened in 31 to 40 feet of water, according to the Florida Museum of Natural History. Attacks on surfers and swimmers are most common in 6 to 10 feet of water, according to the museum.

Do sharks live in the Arabian Gulf? ›

Whale sharks are harmless sea-creatures that filter-feed plankton and other small fish. They are typically found in warm, shallow waters, making the Arabian Gulf and Gulf of Oman suitable habitats.

Do sharks live in Dubai? ›

Whale sharks, which eat plankton and don't attack humans, are one of the 29 different kinds of species calling the waters off Dubai home. They include hammerhead, white cheek, tiger and gray reef sharks.

Are there shark attacks in Dubai? ›

In the UAE, extremely rare. Fisherman can only recall two incidents in recent years when sharks attacked. Sharks are most likely to be found in the Sea of Oman, off the UAE's east coast, and not in the Arabian Gulf.

Are there dolphins in the Persian Gulf? ›

Due to its shallow nature, most native small cetaceans in the Persian Gulf are nearshore species. There are three species of nearshore cetaceans distributed through the area: Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops aduncus): these dolphins are known as one of the most numerous small cetaceans inside the Gulf.

Why are there no sharks in Arabian Sea? ›

Sharks, rays and chimaeras are some of the most threatened fish in the world. More than 50 percent of species in the Arabian Sea are at elevated risk of extinction due to coastal development, overfishing, pollution and habitat destruction.

What kind of fish live in the Persian Gulf? ›

Goatfish, Barracuda, Grouper, Of trevally, Kobia, Mackerel Royal, Grouper, Serial, Tuna striped.

Can a great white shark bite a man in half? ›

How a Great White Shark Strikes | Shark Attack Files - YouTube

Do sharks like human blood? ›

Sharks are not particularly attracted to human blood, contrary to what is shown in movies. It's not actually just blood, but any bodily fluid that might attract sharks. However, they can't sniff out one drop of blood from miles away.

Why do sharks bump you? ›

"Bump and bite" encounters involve a shark circling and often bumping a human before the attack, possibly to assess the size and strength of its prey. And in "sneak" attacks, the shark will strike without any warning.

Are there sharks in Mexico? ›

Shark Attack Statistics

Mexico (the whole country, not just Cancun) scores a lowly 18th registering only 40 attacks over the same 450 year time period. The fact is you are thirty times more likely to be attacked by a shark in the US than you are in Cancun!

Are there sharks in Turkey? ›

Turkey is surrounded by the deep waters of three seas: the Meditteranean Sea, the Black Sea, and the Aegean Sea. And yes, there are sharks; in fact, there are over 50 shark species swimming in Turkish waters, including hammerheads and the notorious great white sharks.

Are there sharks in Saudi Arabia? ›

About 40 sharks, including fully grown adults, have been spotted off the coast of Makkah Province in Saudi Arabia, prompting a warning to beach-goers not to enter the water. Makkah coastal guard Colonel Salih Ash Shahri said sea patrols along the northern corniche had detected the sharks, some of which were 2.5m long.

Are there sharks in England? ›

Contrary to popular belief, sharks do occur around the coasts of Britain. In fact, we have over 40 species! Including some of the fastest, rarest, largest and most highly migratory in the world!

Is there sharks in Qatar? ›

Each year there are hundreds of Whale Sharks that congregate in the waters off the north east coast of Qatar in the months from April to September. While these magnificent creatures are the biggest fish in the ocean, they are also one of the most gentle and majestic creatures that you will find underwater.

Is there sharks in Greece? ›

There are some sharks in the Aegean Sea, but very few.

The few sharks spotted or caught around Greece were harmless like the basking shark, thresher shark, and the dogfish. The basking shark looks frightening, but it's not harmful. The thresher shark is also quite harmless because of its small teeth and timid nature.

Can you swim in Dubai? ›

Re: Is it possible to swim anywhere in Dubai? Yes you can swim as you saw people doing. The difference between public beaches and a beach park or club is that the former has no facilities.

Do you get snakes in Dubai? ›

There are several types of snakes that live in Dubai, which may also be found across the UAE both on land and sea. These include: Annulated Sea Snake. Arabian Cat Snake.

Is the sea in Dubai clean? ›

It's official. Dubai has some of the most pristine beaches 2019 in the world, and that's coming from a globally recognised environmental organisation.

Are there whales in the Persian Gulf? ›

We conclude that the Persian Gulf is part of the habitual range of the Arabian Sea humpback whale population, and has been since at least the mid-Holocene.

Are there whales in the Arabian Gulf? ›

Whales are rarely recorded inside the Arabian Gulf, mostly only appearing when they wash up dead on the shore. However most of these are believed to be Bryde's whales, a related species. Several species of whales, including humpbacks, are also seen rarely off the UAE's East Coast.

Does Arabian Sea have whales? ›

Arabian humpback whales, inhabiting the Arabian Sea, are a small sub population of humpback whales, which are most genetically distinct humpback whales and are considered to be the most isolated whale population on Earth.

Are sharks blind? ›

Sharks are not blind, and their vision is far better than we can imagine. While sharks have trouble distinguishing colors, their vision is still good enough to accomplish death-defying feats when hunting their prey.

Can sharks be blue? ›

Blue sharks are recognizable for their exceptionally slender body and bright blue coloration. They are dark blue on the back, bright blue on the sides, and white on the underside. The colour quickly changes to a uniform dark grey if the shark is removed from the water.

Is there a great white shark in Dubai Aquarium? ›

Dubai aquarium team is giving you a chance that will happen once in your life. Diving with a great white shark was one on my dream list to do before leaving this world and they helped my to get it done.

Who owns the Persian Gulf? ›

Eight nations have coasts along the Persian Gulf: Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates.

How deep is the Persian Gulf? ›

The Persian Gulf is the body of water bordering Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Qatar, United Arab Emirates, and Oman. The Gulf covers area of approximately 87,000 square miles, with a maximum depth of about 330 feet and an average depth of about 115 feet.

Has a black person been attacked by a shark? ›

On the morning of January 15, 1983, a body of a black man washed ashore. Most of the body had been devoured by sharks. It appeared a shark had bit his foot when he was alive. However, it is unknown if this is what caused his death, as he could have drowned before he was bitten.

Do shark bites hurt? ›

“I could feel the vibration of this entire shark gnawing into my skin,” he said. “You could feel the whole body shaking as it's digging into my torso.” The burning sensation of the bite is hard to forget. “The bite mark's like a jellyfish sting that just keeps penetrating deeper and deeper into the bone,” Robles said.

What to do if a shark approaches you? ›

Leave your hand along the side of their body to maintain that extra space in case the shark decides to turn back to you again. “Then after the shark starts to swim away make sure to do a look around and make sure there are no other sharks approaching you.”

Does peeing in the ocean attract sharks? ›

No reaction. From a scientific standpoint, Esbaugh says that it's “definitely not true” that sharks are attracted to urine, and he assumes the rumor got started because many animals use scent to track their prey. But he says this doesn't hold up because humans aren't the most common meal for sharks.

Does a shark ever sleep? ›

Sharks can sleep, and often opt to keep their eyes open while they do, according to new research published in Biology Letters. Because some sharks must swim constantly to keep oxygen-rich water flowing over their gills, it has long been rumored that they don't snooze at all.

Can sharks smell fear? ›

So, no, sharks can't smell fear. They have a sharp sense of smell. But they can only smell anything that interrelates with the sensory cells embedded in their nares. And since fear can only interact with your emotions, sharks can smell fear.

Has a shark ever saved a human? ›

Shark Attack Saves Man's Life - YouTube

Has a shark ever eaten a full human? ›

A teacher was "swallowed alive" by a great white shark as he fished with friends in south Australia, an inquest has heard. Sam Kellet, 28, was planning to dive at a different spot 100km away from Goldsmith Beach, west of Adelaide, but a catastrophic fire warning forced them to move, ITV reported.

What month do most shark attacks happen? ›

Attacks spike in September

In Florida, the U.S. state with the most shark attacks, September is the most dangerous month to be in the water, according to the International Shark Attack File. From 1926 to 2019, 103 attacks occurred in that month, compared to 61 in June, 73 in July, and 84 in August.

Are there sharks in Jamaica? ›

Are there sharks in Jamaica? Tiger, hammerhead, Caribbean reef, nurse and bull sharks can all be found in Jamaica's warm waters - but don't worry. These sharks are not aggressive and are unlikely to attack unless provoked.

Where is the largest shark population? ›

The USA and Australia are the most sharks infested countries in the world. Since the year 1580, a total of 642 shark attacks killed more than 155 people in Australia. In the United States, 1,441 attacks have already caused over 35 deaths.

Is there sharks in Cuba? ›

Cuba is home to roughly 54 of the 500 known species of sharks including: Whale Sharks, Caribbean Reef Sharks, Great Hammerheads, Blacktip Sharks, Silky Sharks, Nurse Sharks, Shortfin Mako Sharks, Smalltooth Sawfishes.

Are there sharks in Italy? ›

In Europe, Italy has had the most recorded shark attacks. Surprisingly, perhaps, the UK comes next, with a total of 38 attacks since 1900, followed by Spain with 33.

What beach has the most shark attacks? ›

New Smyrna Beach, Florida

Florida has more shark attacks each year than any other area in the world, according to the International Shark Attack File (ISAF).

Are there sharks in Egypt? ›

Shark attacks are rare in Egypt, but previous attacks that happened in the past decade caused panic and made tourists desert some of the beaches where these attacks happened for days. In December 2010, four tourists were injured after they were attacked by a shark in the Red Sea resort of Sharm el-Sheikh.

Is there sharks in UAE? ›

A total of 12,478 individual sharks originating from UAE Arabian Gulf waters were recorded in this study with 30 species confirmed and validated morphologically and through genetic barcoding.

Is there sharks in Kuwait? ›

One of the main types of sharks living in Kuwaiti waters is the Whale shark, which is considered to be one of the largest of its species. The peaceful and friendly fish may appear near the shore in search of food and it is sought after by many divers to take photos.

Are there sharks in Thailand? ›

In Thailand, the three most-commonly seen species are the Whitetip Reef Shark (Triaenodon obesus), the Blacktip Reef Shark (Carcharhinus melanopterus) and the Zebra Shark (Stegostoma fasciatum). Whitetip Reef Sharks & Zebra Sharks are both nocturnal hunters, so they tend to sleep during the day.

Is there sharks in UAE? ›

A total of 12,478 individual sharks originating from UAE Arabian Gulf waters were recorded in this study with 30 species confirmed and validated morphologically and through genetic barcoding.

Are there dolphins in the Persian Gulf? ›

Due to its shallow nature, most native small cetaceans in the Persian Gulf are nearshore species. There are three species of nearshore cetaceans distributed through the area: Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops aduncus): these dolphins are known as one of the most numerous small cetaceans inside the Gulf.

Are there sharks in Ras Al Khaimah? ›

A grey reef shark was caught on camera swimming in the waters of Ras Al Khaimah. The sea creature was recorded by Sian Townley on Al Marjan Island during the weekend. The footage of the shark swimming along the breakwater was posted on Facebook and has since been widely shared.

Are there sharks in the sea of Oman? ›

A leopard shark swims near the Daymaniyat Islands in the Gulf of Oman. Sharks in the Arabian Sea and surrounding waters are among the most imperiled worldwide. Sharks, rays and chimaeras are some of the most threatened fish in the world.

Can you swim in Dubai? ›

Re: Is it possible to swim anywhere in Dubai? Yes you can swim as you saw people doing. The difference between public beaches and a beach park or club is that the former has no facilities.

What shark is brown? ›

Sandbar shark Sandbar shark(Carcharhinus plumbeus), also called the brown shark, is found nearshore typically at depths ranging from 60 to 200 feet. It is both a predator and scavenger, feeding chiefly near the bottom on fish and shellfish.

What jellyfish are in Dubai? ›

Three types of jellyfish are commonly found in Dubai waters — the blue blubber jellyfish between April and May, upside-down jellyfish, and nettle jellyfish between September and October.

Are there whales in the Persian Gulf? ›

We conclude that the Persian Gulf is part of the habitual range of the Arabian Sea humpback whale population, and has been since at least the mid-Holocene.

What lives in the Persian Gulf? ›

The Persian Gulf is one of the largest habitats for marine organisms such as corals, small ornamental fish, edible and non-edible fish, oysters, snails, mollusks, sea anemones, sea sponges, Jelly fish, turtles, many dolphins and sharks.

Are there whales in the Arabian Gulf? ›

Whales are rarely recorded inside the Arabian Gulf, mostly only appearing when they wash up dead on the shore. However most of these are believed to be Bryde's whales, a related species. Several species of whales, including humpbacks, are also seen rarely off the UAE's East Coast.

There may be no Great Whites, but there are still many teeth swimming in Arabian Gulf

Typically growing up to eight metres long, the biggest whale shark recorded measured 12.6 metres long and weighed a hefty 21 tonnes.. They feed on a variety of prey ranging from bony fish, to smaller sharks and stingrays.. Although dangerous, the great hammerhead attacks humans only when provoked.. This one is a slow-moving predator feeding mainly on bony fishes and rarely travels long distances.. Usually found: Coastal waters. The tawny nurse shark is a species of ‘carpet’ shark, because it swims very low in shallow water.. The sandbar shark, true to its nickname, is commonly found over muddy or sandy bottoms in shallow coastal water.. The bull shark is found worldwide in warm, shallow waters along coasts and in rivers.. They are some of the most abundant sharks in the Arabian Gulf and they prefer shallow, inshore waters.. This species typically reaches a length of 1.6 metres.. Usually found: Coastal waters. The whitetip reef shark is a small shark usually not exceeding 1 metre.. There are more than 30 different species of shark off the coast of the UAE, some are rare, some not so much.

Emma Ashford: Hey, Matt, how are things? Are you back from Europe yet?  Matthew Kroenig: Not yet. Now I am

In recent years, the Gulf states have pursued foreign-policy objectives that are often profoundly at odds with Washington’s own interests—funding extremists in Syria, for example—and they have dramatically increased their economic ties with Asian states.. The security and economic interests of these states and those of the United States have been diverging for some time.. MK: The United States gets much from its partnerships with the Gulf states.. When the United States doesn’t have any major interests at stake, it should consider human rights concerns, and Biden’s treatment of Mohammed bin Salman has been appropriate considering his crimes and considering the dwindling importance of Saudi Arabia to direct U.S. interests.. The United States went through the whole Cold War without offering a concrete security guarantee to the Saudis, for example, and you could make a much stronger argument that they were intrinsically important to the U.S. economy during that period.. If America doesn’t make a security guarantee to the UAE, oil will continue to flow into world markets, the Middle East security situation will continue much as it has, and the growing ties between Israel and the Gulf states will persist.. Washington spent most of the Cold War successfully maintaining its position in the region through offshore balancing: without a substantial military presence , and without offering security guarantees to most regional states.

Armed with a clip board and wearing bright yellow waders, Rima Jabado looked the part of a government inspector at the Dubai fish market as workers sawed the fins off hundreds of dead sharks from Oman and bagged them for export to Asian restaurants.

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates — FILE - In this Tuesday, June 12, 2012 file photo, workers cut shark fins at a fish market in Dubai , United Arab Emirates.. The fin trade has devastated several species including hammerheads, oceanic whitetip, blue, threshers and silky and contributed to 181 shark and ray species being listed by the International Union for Conservation of Nature as threatened with extinction.. The trade is legal, though efforts are being made to ban the practice of “finning” hacking the fins off of sharks and throwing the rest overboard, often when they are still alive.. The fin trade has devastated several species including hammerheads, oceanic whitetip, blue, threshers and silky and contributed to 181 shark and ray species being listed by the International Union for Conservation of Nature as threatened with extinction.. The trade is legal, though efforts are being made to ban the practice of “finning” hacking the fins off of sharks and throwing the rest overboard, often when they are still alive.. The fin trade has devastated several species including hammerheads, oceanic whitetip, blue, threshers and silky and contributed to 181 shark and ray species being listed by the International Union for Conservation of Nature as threatened with extinction.. The trade is legal, though efforts are being made to ban the practice of “finning” hacking the fins off of sharks and throwing the rest overboard, often when they are still alive.. FILE - In this Tuesday, July 3, 2012 photo, Rima Jabado, a marine scientist and shark researcher pulls up a baby spottail shark from the water for the tagging off the Dubai coast, United Arab Emirates.. The fin trade has devastated several species including hammerheads, oceanic whitetip, blue, threshers and silky and contributed to 181 shark and ray species being listed by the International Union for Conservation of Nature as threatened with extinction.. FILE - In this Tuesday, July 3, 2012 file photo, Rima Jabado, right, a marine scientist and shark researcher measures a baby spottail shark before she tagged and released it back to the sea, off the Dubai coast , United Arab Emirates.. The fin trade has devastated several species including hammerheads, oceanic whitetip, blue, threshers and silky and contributed to 181 shark and ray species being listed by the International Union for Conservation of Nature as threatened with extinction.. The fin trade has devastated several species including hammerheads, oceanic whitetip, blue, threshers and silky and contributed to 181 shark and ray species being listed by the International Union for Conservation of Nature as threatened with extinction.. They have almost no data on the numbers and species of sharks that can be found from the Red Sea to the Gulf of Oman, often lack the laws that would curb the trade and don’t have the money or the political will to enforce the laws they do have on the books, such as bans on shark fishing.

At the risk of employing an over-used analogy to emphasise a point, if one were to try to describe the state of relations among Persian Gulf[i] nations to a visiting delegation of extra-terrestrials from Mars, they would be hard-pressed to find a logical explanation for the dearth of good neighbourliness. The region is brimming with … Continued

As the two regional heavyweights, Saudi Arabia and Iran respectively enjoy considerable clout in the Persian Gulf and indeed the wider Middle East.. The common theme which began with most of the GCC states uniting against Iran through their support for Iraq’s war has persevered until the present day, with some of the same states – led by Saudi Arabia – adopting a stance of unmasked animosity towards Iran in a continual quest to ostracise it as a foreign, Persian, Shi’a ‘other’ amidst like-minded, co-religionist Arab brethren.. In essence, what began as mutual rivalry and a mistrust of intentions becomes a matter of collective racism, bigotry and prejudice towards an entire 80-million strong population as well as to all adherents of the Shi’a faith, even among compatriots.. By advocating the above mentioned divisive worldview, the Saudi regime and those like it are in effect condemning the region to a state of perpetual enmity and ethno-social discord.. Saudi Arabia and Iran are the Middle East’s two most important petrochemical players.. There are a range of other industries from which both countries, and indeed all the Persian Gulf nations, would profit from increased and open trade in, lessening the region’s dependence on Western markets and potentially promoting the economic diversification that some of these countries have been striving for.. Were normalised and cooperative relations to proliferate, firms and investors in the region could utilise each other’s markets; the great amounts of time, money and risk involved for national firms of the UAE, for instance, in finding ways around economic sanctions in order to trade with Iranian firms would be a non-issue.. This brings us to the next area of potential net gains, that of moral legitimacy and soft power.. Finally, and most importantly, countries in the Persian Gulf would have much to gain in overall regional security through greater cooperation, particularly between the powerhouses of Saudi Arabia and Iran.. Regardless of the intention, it cannot be denied that Saudi propaganda against the Shi’a sect and Iran as a whole results in the amplification of the already-deep schism between the Sunni and Shi’a sects, and between the Arab and Persian populations.. Audacious hope: a region at peace. On the other hand, it is clear to see the potential net benefits of détente and cooperation based on goodwill as outlined above, particularly for the two regional heavyweights, Saudi Arabia and Iran.. Therefore, there would be less sectarianism in thought and in practice across the Middle East, with communities ceasing to feel victimised and hated as the subject of official smear campaigns.. [iv] Suzanne Maloney, ‘Iran’s Long Reach: Iran as a Pivotal State in the Muslim World’, Foreign Affairs , May/June 2009, available at http://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/65037/suzanne-maloney/irans-long-reach-iran-as-a-pivotal-state-in-the-muslim-world

Armed with a clip board and wearing bright yellow waders, Rima Jabado looked the part of a government inspector at the Dubai fish market as workers sawed the fins off hundreds of dead sharks from Oman and bagged them for export to Asian restaurants.

"We know shark populations are depleting around the world so we are kind of racing against time to see what is going on.". Four years ago, under international pressure, the UAE joined the growing number of countries banning the practice.. The trade thrives in the Persian Gulf, as it does worldwide, shark conservationists said, mainly because there aren't enough people out there like Jabado.. Governments in the region have until now largely ignored sharks in favor of more commercial fish species like grouper.. They have almost no data on the numbers and species of sharks that can be found from the Red Sea to the Gulf of Oman, often lack the laws that would curb the trade and don't have the money or the political will to enforce the laws they do have on the books, such as bans on shark fishing.. Governments from across the Persian Gulf sent representatives and all offered testimony of just why their country wasn't doing more to protect sharks.. Kuwait talked of protecting two shark species but admitted enforcement of its ban on shark fishing was weak and that government inspectors and fishermen couldn't even identify them.. Saudi Arabia claimed it banned the export of fins in 2008 but had no answers as to why its fins continue to turn up in Hong Kong markets.. Oman sent a government team with no experience with sharks while Bahrain and the UAE admitted they lacked sufficient data to determine whether sharks were overfished in their waters.. Yemen and Somalia, whose sharks routinely turn up in Dubai's market, are typical of countries with bigger problems.. "If you go to the Somalia coast at night, you will see thousands of ships fishing illegally, mostly for sharks and lobster," Ahmed Shaikh Mahmoud Osman, wildlife director for Somalia's Ministry of Fisheries and Environment, said of the boats which come primarily from Asian countries.. Dulvey, Fordham and Jabado encouraged the region's governments to start collecting data and using it to draw up management plans which can include quotas and outright bans on endangered shark species.. Until now, no governments in the Gulf have quotas on shark fishing nor have any national shark conservation plans.. From that, she has concluded there are 30 shark species in the waters off the coast of the UAE and 37 coming in from Oman — about two-thirds which are listed by the IUCN as near threatened or endangered including several hammerheads.

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) ? Armed with a clip board and wearing bright yellow waders, Rima Jabado looked the part of a government i...

The fin trade has devastated several species including hammerheads, oceanic whitetip, blue, threshers and silky and contributed to 181 shark and ray species being listed by the International Union for Conservation of Nature as threatened with extinction.. They have almost no data on the numbers and species of sharks that can be found from the Red Sea to the Gulf of Oman, often lack the laws that would curb the trade and don't have the money or the political will to enforce the laws they do have on the books, such as bans on shark fishing.. "In an ideal world what we would have is every population of every shark monitored so we know how many adults there are," said Nick Dulvy, a Canadian researcher who is the co-chair of IUCN's Shark Specialist Group that is tasked with determining which species are endangered.. Kuwait talked of protecting two shark species but admitted enforcement of its ban on shark fishing was weak and that government inspectors and fishermen couldn't even identify them.. Oman sent a government team with no experience with sharks while Bahrain and the UAE admitted they lacked sufficient data to determine whether sharks were overfished in their waters.. Dulvey, Fordham and Jabado encouraged the region's governments to start collecting data and using it to draw up management plans which can include quotas and outright bans on endangered shark species.. Until now, no governments in the Gulf have quotas on shark fishing nor have any national shark conservation plans.. Oman and Yemen have promised to develop shark conservation plans while Oman and Abu Dhabi have started doing stock assessments of several shark species ?. For the most part, though, the job of data collection is left to Jabado, who for the past two years has visited fish markets across the UAE 180 times, identifying shark species, sex ratio and abundance among other things.

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) – Armed with a clip board and wearing bright yellow waders, Rima Jabado looked the part of a government inspector at the Dubai fish market as workers sawed th…

‘We know shark populations are depleting around the world so we are kind of racing against time to see what is going on.’. Four years ago, under international pressure, the UAE joined the growing number of countries banning the practice.. Governments in the region have until now largely ignored sharks in favor of more commercial fish species like grouper.. They have almost no data on the numbers and species of sharks that can be found from the Red Sea to the Gulf of Oman, often lack the laws that would curb the trade and don’t have the money or the political will to enforce the laws they do have on the books, such as bans on shark fishing.. Yemen and Somalia, whose sharks routinely turn up in Dubai’s market, are typical of countries with bigger problems.. Both have thriving shark fisheries – Yemen ranks sixth in exporters to Hong Kong and is one of the few countries that consume sharks domestically.. Dulvey, Fordham and Jabado encouraged the region’s governments to start collecting data and using it to draw up management plans which can include quotas and outright bans on endangered shark species.. Until now, no governments in the Gulf have quotas on shark fishing nor have any national shark conservation plans.. From that, she has concluded there are 30 shark species in the waters off the coast of the UAE and 37 coming in from Oman – about two-thirds which are listed by the IUCN as near threatened or endangered including several hammerheads.. She also has interviewed more than 100 fishermen and spent more than 100 hours on boats tagging sharks in the Persian Gulf.

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) ? Armed with a clip board and wearing bright yellow waders, Rima Jabado looked the part of a government i...

They have almost no data on the numbers and species of sharks that can be found from the Red Sea to the Gulf of Oman, often lack the laws that would curb the trade and don't have the money or the political will to enforce the laws they do have on the books, such as bans on shark fishing.. Kuwait talked of protecting two shark species but admitted enforcement of its ban on shark fishing was weak and that government inspectors and fishermen couldn't even identify them.. Oman sent a government team with no experience with sharks while Bahrain and the UAE admitted they lacked sufficient data to determine whether sharks were overfished in their waters.. Until now, no governments in the Gulf have quotas on shark fishing nor have any national shark conservation plans.. Oman and Yemen have promised to develop shark conservation plans while Oman and Abu Dhabi have started doing stock assessments of several shark species ?

Armed with a clip board and wearing bright yellow waders, Rima Jabado looked the part of a government inspector at the Dubai fish market as workers sawed the fins off hundreds of dead sharks from Oman and bagged them for export to Asian restaurants. - Articles from The Weather Channel | weather.com

In this Tuesday, July 3, 2012 photo, Rima Jabado, a marine scientist and shark researcher pulls up a baby spottail shark from the water for the tagging off the Dubai coast, United Arab Emirates.. DUBAI, United Arab Emirates -- Armed with a clip board and wearing bright yellow waders, Rima Jabado looked the part of a government inspector at the Dubai fish market as workers sawed the fins off hundreds of dead sharks from Oman and bagged them for export to Asian restaurants.. The fin trade has devastated several species including hammerheads, oceanic whitetip, blue, threshers and silky and contributed to 181 shark and ray species being listed by the International Union for Conservation of Nature as threatened with extinction.. Governments in the region have until now largely ignored sharks in favor of more commercial fish species like grouper.They have almost no data on the numbers and species of sharks that can be found from the Red Sea to the Gulf of Oman, often lack the laws that would curb the trade and don't have the money or the political will to enforce the laws they do have on the books, such as bans on shark fishing.. "In an ideal world what we would have is every population of every shark monitored so we know how many adults there are," said Nick Dulvy, a Canadian researcher who is the co-chair of IUCN's Shark Specialist Group that is tasked with determining which species are endangered.. Kuwait talked of protecting two shark species but admitted enforcement of its ban on shark fishing was weak and that government inspectors and fishermen couldn't even identify them.. Oman sent a government team with no experience with sharks while Bahrain and the UAE admitted they lacked sufficient data to determine whether sharks were overfished in their waters.. Both have thriving shark fisheries — Yemen ranks sixth in exporters to Hong Kong and is one of the few countries that consume sharks domestically.. Dulvey, Fordham and Jabado encouraged the region's governments to start collecting data and using it to draw up management plans which can include quotas and outright bans on endangered shark species.. Until now, no governments in the Gulf have quotas on shark fishing nor have any national shark conservation plans.. Oman and Yemen have promised to develop shark conservation plans while Oman and Abu Dhabi have started doing stock assessments of several shark species -- the first step in developing a management plan.. For the most part, though, the job of data collection is left to Jabado, who for the past two years has visited fish markets across the UAE 180 times, identifying shark species, sex ratio and abundance among other things.. From that, she has concluded there are 30 shark species in the waters off the coast of the UAE and 37 coming in from Oman -- about two-thirds which are listed by the IUCN as near threatened or endangered including several hammerheads.. She has only caught five sharks herself in that time, confirming what 82 percent of the Emirati fishermen she interviewed have said: Shark numbers are down and those caught are much smaller.. "They used to catch monstrous sharks, sharks bigger than a bus.

Tensions in the Persian Gulf escalate as a U.S. Navy vessel fires on a fishing boat, killing one and wounding three; survivors say the ship issued no warnings. by Jack Kenny

Survivors of gunfire from a U.S. Navy vessel that killed one and wounded three others on a fishing boat off the coast of the United Arab Emirates have disputed claims that the crew had ignored warnings to stay away from the American ship, Reuters reported .. “We know warning signs and sounds and there were none; it was very sudden,” said Muniraj, one of four Indian nationals struck by the gunfire.. A Navy spokesman said the fishing boat was about 10 miles from the port and approaching the USNS Rappahannock (pictured, number 204) a replenishment oiler used to refuel other ships, when the ship’s crew issued warnings to stay away.. U.S. crews have had increased apprehension of approaching vessels since al-Qaeda suicide bombers in 2000 rammed a boat loaded with explosives into the side of the USS Cole in the port of Aden in Yemen, killing 17 U.S. sailors.. U.S. warships moved into the area after Iran threatened it would close the Strait of Hormuz, through which 40 percent of the world’s oil exports flow, if the United States and the European Union follow through on threats of increased economic sanctions over Iran’s nuclear program.. The United States has repeatedly warned that it will take whatever action is necessary, including military strikes, to prevent Iran from developing a nuclear weapon.. That same day, Israel’s Defense Minister Ehud Barak warned that military action may be needed before it is “too late” to prevent Iran from completing development of nuclear weapons.. A National Intelligence Estimate in 2007 concluded that Tehran abandoned its nuclear weapons program in 2003, a finding affirmed by a 2010 NIE report of 16 U.S. intelligence agencies.. “It’s absolutely fair to say that we are on the same page at this moment, trying to figure our way forward to have the maximum impact on affecting the decisions that Iran makes,” Clinton said at a press conference in the ancient capital.. Obama’s National Security Advisor Tom Donilon preceded Clinton’s visit by a few days, the AP reported, and Defense Secretary Leon Panetta is expected in Israel soon.

Videos

1. How Dolphins Protect the U.S. Navy
(Real Science)
2. Desert Seas
(aramco)
3. DCS WORLD FAKE CONFLICTS PERSIAN GULF
(Douglas Rangel)
4. 9 FT GREAT WHITE SHARK EATEN BY UNIDENTIFIED SEA CREATURE
(fr8haullr561)
5. Video: The fight to curb shark finning in the Gulf
(The National News)
6. Shark Conservation Society
(Simon Spear)

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