Semina Halliwell: Rape victim, 12, took her own life directly after police interview, her mother tells Sky News (2022)

A 12-year-old rape victim took her own life directly after an interview with a police officer who had previously discouraged her from bringing forward a criminal complaint and subsequently failed to properly investigate it, her mother has told Sky News.

Semina Halliwell, who had autism, alleged she was raped by an older boy who attended the same school as her and had groomed her over Snapchat into secretly meeting him.

Her mother, Rachel Halliwell, contacted the police after Semina broke down and told her what had happened following a severe incident of self-harm.

Semina Halliwell: Rape victim, 12, took her own life directly after police interview, her mother tells Sky News (1)

But officers from Merseyside Police "made Semina feel like she was an inconvenience to them", according to two family members who were present during interviews, and no charges have been brought against the alleged perpetrator who Semina named.

Discouraged from making the complaint

Rachel, alongside Semina's aunt Clare Halliwell, said the lead detective "sat there and started talking about all the forms he'd have to fill in if she made the complaint and how long it would take him to fill those forms in".

The detective "said to Semina that, you know, basically, it's your word against his and do you really want this hanging over your head for 18 months, because it wouldn't go to court for 18 months to two years," said Clare.

Semina's autism had already made it a challenge for her to express herself to strangers, they added.

The family told Sky News that Merseyside Police did not inform Semina's school of the reported rape, despite assurances to the family that safeguarding would be in place. This meant she was forced to stay at home as she was not protected from coming into contact with the alleged perpetrator.

Semina Halliwell: Rape victim, 12, took her own life directly after police interview, her mother tells Sky News (2)

Harassment and witness intimidation

Following the initial interview, Semina and her family - including a sibling - were targeted in a campaign of online and offline bullying and witness intimidation, including several violent assaults, that the family believe were committed by associates of the alleged perpetrator and which they say Merseyside Police also failed to fully investigate.

"They said anyone going to the police are going to go get their heads kicked in. And that's exactly what happened. Semina was beaten up three times, videoed, her [sibling] was beaten up in school," said Rachel.

(Video) 12 year old victim walks out of police interview and kills herself

The family said that during this period only two girls were prosecuted for assaulting Semina. Other incidents were not fully investigated, they complained.

Rachel was also convicted of an assault which took place shortly after Semina named the alleged perpetrator. Sky News cannot identify the victim for legal reasons.

"Even though there were videos of [Semina] being beaten up on social media, the police did nothing about it. The officer, the detective, said 'Well, things have quietened down now, so if I go around it might kick off all over again'," Rachel added.

Semina Halliwell: Rape victim, 12, took her own life directly after police interview, her mother tells Sky News (3)

Final interview with police

Three months after the initial complaint was made, during another interview in the family's living room regarding the rape and harassment, Semina said "I've had enough of this" and went upstairs.

"I thought she just had enough of the police being here, the police doing nothing," was her mother's understanding at the time.

But Semina had gone to take the medication which would kill her, consuming well above the lethal dose of a toxic drug used to treat a chronic condition.

After the police had left, the family discovered the empty medicine packets and Semina was taken to hospital in an ambulance. Over the next few days she would be placed in an induced coma and suffered multiple organ failure before dying.

"It was horrific to watch my daughter pass away. It was terrible what she went through, three heart attacks, operations, they were going to amputate her legs, amputate her fingers," said Rachel.

"People seem to think that when you take an overdose you go to sleep and you die. No she didn't. She didn't at all. We had to watch her die, her body shut down first. No parent should go through that."

"We had the medical team sobbing around us," said Clare. "I remember [the consultant] coming to me and he was crying through his glasses and I don't remember how long they were there, I just remember that she was warm when I first touched her but then she went cold, she went cold, she started to go blue.

"Nobody said she died. Nobody told us. Nobody could say it."

Semina Halliwell: Rape victim, 12, took her own life directly after police interview, her mother tells Sky News (4)

(Video) Bullies Throw Rocks & Poo At 12 Year Old Rape Victims Grave, After She Killed Herself

Semina's grave was vandalised

The family was not left to grieve in peace.

"The day after her funeral, somebody put out on Snapchat - which was a fake account - £10,000 for somebody to video and trash Semina's grave. And two weeks later, it was [trashed]," they told Sky News.

The videos of Semina being bullied and violently attacked - videos showing her being dragged and pushed to the ground and punched and kicked by other girls - were directed at the family on social media following the funeral, as were messages celebrating Semina's death.

Her family say Merseyside Police consistently failed to properly investigate this harassment just as the force failed to properly investigate Semina's allegation of rape.

Semina Halliwell: Rape victim, 12, took her own life directly after police interview, her mother tells Sky News (5)

Harassment targeting the family

"We had Snapchat pictures, edited of her lying in a coffin, or decomposing, sent to us [from] fake accounts, and the police either couldn't or wouldn't do anything about it.

"The police did say if she had been murdered, then it would have been different because they could have triangulated the signals to the phone to prove that they were near people they suspected of doing it, but they couldn't do that because it wasn't a serious crime," Clare told Sky News.

"The police failings are absolutely disgusting," said Rachel, who blamed "the perpetrator, his family, Merseyside Police, and social services".

"Everybody who is paid to safeguard her let her down. Not one of them told her she was worth their time."

"We've been robbed of a massive piece of our family, and for the last nine and a half months we've been robbed of the ability to grieve that loss," said Clare.

Semina Halliwell: Rape victim, 12, took her own life directly after police interview, her mother tells Sky News (6)

Police issues with digital investigations

(Video) Why I Shared the Video of My Daughter Being Attacked by Bullies | This Morning

Rachel and Clare Halliwell contacted Sky News following our investigation into police failings in the case of Abdul Elahi, a prolific online sexual predator who targeted girls and vulnerable women.

More than a dozen victims had reported him to their local forces, but none of those reports were pursued until after Elahi was identified by the FBI investigating the blackmailing of a 15-year-old girl in the US.

Instead, according to multiple victims, British police gave them the impression that it was they who were to blame for being extorted into sending intimate images of themselves.

Officers also incorrectly told the girls and women that they could not obtain any evidence from the digital platforms Elahi had used to extort and blackmail them.

A study from the University of Suffolk in 2018 warned there was "an urgent need for training across police forces" - as fewer than a fifth of police force members knew how to collect evidence from technology companies.

Semina Halliwell's family said Merseyside Police responded similarly regarding the harassment of the family and Semina over Snapchat, and they do not believe the police sought any data from the company as evidence.

Semina Halliwell: Rape victim, 12, took her own life directly after police interview, her mother tells Sky News (7)

According to Rachel, the police "tried to justify their actions - or lack of them - by saying Semina wouldn't hand the phone over" and countered this by saying Semina had "offered her phone up several times".

Even then, seizing a victim's phone is not essential to the investigation of these crimes, as stated by national training materials seen by Sky News.

One training presentation from the College of Policing advises that "capturing a screenshot of a social media post regarding a hate crime may be sufficient to prove the offence. Seizure of the device may not necessarily be required".

In the case of Snapchat, although the content of messages is usually automatically deleted after 30 days, the company can retain metadata and potentially content if it receives a request to do so.

In its advice for law enforcement, Snap says it can also provide basic subscriber information - potentially including phone numbers and the IP addresses used to log in - as long as police provide a username.

According to Europol these two types of evidence are the most important information that investigators can collect during digital investigations, while content data is only the seventh most valuable.

Location data, as would have been established by the triangulation methods suggested by officers to Semina's family, was considered only the eighth most important type of data when investigating digital crimes.

Semina's phone was taken by Merseyside Police following her death and is still in the police's possession.

(Video) Shamima Begum Says She’d ‘Rather Die’ Than Return to ISIS as She Seeks Forgiveness | GMB

The family has requested that it be returned to them as it contains images and videos of Semina which are not available elsewhere.

Semina Halliwell: Rape victim, 12, took her own life directly after police interview, her mother tells Sky News (8)

Coroner to hold inquest in due course

A spokesperson for Snapchat was unable to confirm whether the app had received any requests for information from Merseyside Police in Semina's case.

They said: "This situation is devastating and our thoughts are with the family at this difficult time.

"Nothing is more important than the safety and wellbeing of our community. We strictly prohibit bullying, harassment and other types of unwanted contact."

"Our global law enforcement operations team supports police investigations, and we have the ability to preserve and provide content to the authorities when we receive requests for assistance," they added.

A spokesperson for Merseyside Police told Sky News it was "not appropriate" for the force "to comment on any of the substantive issues raised at this time, as we would not wish to prejudice the coronial investigation".

"However, we have, and are, co-operating fully with the coroner in this matter," the spokesperson added.

The force declined the opportunity to discuss any of the family's complaints with Sky News.

A spokesperson for the Home Office said: "This is a heartbreaking case and our thoughts are with Semina's family and loved ones.

"No woman or girl should live in fear of violence or sexual abuse and victims should never be denied the justice they deserve."

They added: "This is why we are committed to ensuring more perpetrators face the full force of the law and overhauling our response to rape including increased funding for victim support services.

"It is important that the coroner is given the space to reach their conclusions and it would be inappropriate to comment further at this stage."

The senior administrator at the Sefton, St Helens & Knowsley Coroner's Service told Sky News the initial inquiry was ongoing and a full inquest into Semina's death would be held in due course.

(Video) Zara McDermott: Why I Made 'Uncovering Rape Culture' | BBC Three

Anyone feeling emotionally distressed or suicidal can call Samaritans for help on 116 123 or email jo@samaritans.org in the UK. In the US, call the Samaritans branch in your area or 1 (800) 273-TALK

A 12-year-old rape victim took her own life directly after an interview with a police officer who had previously discouraged her from bringing forward a criminal complaint and subsequently failed to properly investigate it, her mother has told Sky News.. Her mother, Rachel Halliwell, contacted the police after Semina broke down and told her what had happened following a severe incident of self-harm.. But officers from Merseyside Police "made Semina feel like she was an inconvenience to them", according to two family members who were present during interviews, and no charges have been brought against the alleged perpetrator who Semina named.. The family told Sky News that Merseyside Police did not inform Semina's school of the reported rape, despite assurances to the family that safeguarding would be in place.. Following the initial interview, Semina and her family - including a sibling - were targeted in a campaign of online and offline bullying and witness intimidation, including several violent assaults, that the family believe were committed by associates of the alleged perpetrator and which they say Merseyside Police also failed to fully investigate.. The videos of Semina being bullied and violently attacked - videos showing her being dragged and pushed to the ground and punched and kicked by other girls - were directed at the family on social media following the funeral, as were messages celebrating Semina's death.. Her family say Merseyside Police consistently failed to properly investigate this harassment just as the force failed to properly investigate Semina's allegation of rape.. "The police did say if she had been murdered, then it would have been different because they could have triangulated the signals to the phone to prove that they were near people they suspected of doing it, but they couldn't do that because it wasn't a serious crime," Clare told Sky News.. "The police failings are absolutely disgusting," said Rachel, who blamed "the perpetrator, his family, Merseyside Police, and social services".. Semina Halliwell's family said Merseyside Police responded similarly regarding the harassment of the family and Semina over Snapchat, and they do not believe the police sought any data from the company as evidence.. According to Rachel, the police "tried to justify their actions - or lack of them - by saying Semina wouldn't hand the phone over" and countered this by saying Semina had "offered her phone up several times".. Semina's phone was taken by Merseyside Police following her death and is still in the police's possession.. A spokesperson for Merseyside Police told Sky News it was "not appropriate" for the force "to comment on any of the substantive issues raised at this time, as we would not wish to prejudice the coronial investigation".

Semina Halliwell, 12, from Southport, Merseyside, was allegedly raped by an older boy after being groomed over Snapchat before her death on June 12 last year.. Semina's mother Rachel (right) and aunt Clare (left) told Sky News that Semina was 'made to feel like she was an inconvenience' by Merseyside Police. The family say Semina was 'made to feel like she was an inconvenience' to Merseyside Police and no charges were brought against the alleged offender - whom she had named.. Instead, the family say Semina was forced to stay at home in order to prevent coming into contact with the alleged offender.. Her family believe these offences were carried out by associates of the alleged suspect and claim Merseyside Police again failed to fully investigate the allegations.. Rachel said the family received threats they were 'going to get their heads kicked in' if they approached police, with Semina later filmed while being assaulted at school.. In a later interview with police in the living room of the family home, three months after the initial allegations were raised, Semina said 'I've had enough of this' and went upstairs.. It included edited pictures of Semina 'lying in a coffin' sent from fake accounts, but the family say police did not adequately probe further allegations of harassment.

It's always so hard to find the right words for things like this.. It brings so much anger and sorrow.. It's heartbreaking what the girl and her family had and have to go through.. And so insane how people react with complete lack of empathy and absolutely disgusting acts of cruelty.. It's always so hard to find the right words for things like this.. It brings so much anger and sorrow.. And so insane how people react with complete lack of empathy and absolutely disgusting acts of cruelty.

A 12-year-old rape victim took her own life directly after an interview with a police officer who had previously discouraged her from bringing forward a criminal complaint and subsequently failed to properly investigate it, her mother has told Sky News.Semina Halliwell, who had autism, alleged she was raped by an older boy who attended the same school as her and had groomed her over Snapchat into secretly meeting him.Her mother, Rachel Halliwell, contacted the police after Semina broke down and told her what had happened following a severe incident of self-harm.. But officers from Merseyside Police “made Semina feel like she was an inconvenience to them”, according to two family members who were present during interviews, and no charges have been brought against the alleged perpetrator who Semina named.Discouraged from making the complaintRachel, alongside Semina’s aunt Clare Halliwell, said the lead detective “sat there and started talking about all the forms he’d have to fill in if she made the complaint and how long it would take him to fill those forms in”.The detective “said to Semina that, you know, basically, it’s your word against his and do you really want this hanging over your head for 18 months, because it wouldn’t go to court for 18 months to two years,” said Clare.Semina’s autism had already made it a challenge for her to express herself to strangers, they added.The family told Sky News that Merseyside Police did not inform Semina’s school of the reported rape, despite assurances to the family that safeguarding would be in place.. Harassment and witness intimidationFollowing the initial interview, Semina and her family – including a sibling – were targeted in a campaign of online and offline bullying and witness intimidation, including several violent assaults, that the family believe were committed by associates of the alleged perpetrator and which they say Merseyside Police also failed to fully investigate.”They said anyone going to the police are going to go get their heads kicked in.. Final interview with policeThree months after the initial complaint was made, during another interview in the family’s living room regarding the rape and harassment, Semina said “I’ve had enough of this” and went upstairs.”I thought she just had enough of the police being here, the police doing nothing,” was her mother’s understanding at the time.But Semina had gone to take the medication which would kill her, consuming well above the lethal dose of a toxic drug used to treat a chronic condition.After the police had left, the family discovered the empty medicine packets and Semina was taken to hospital in an ambulance.. No she didn’t.. She didn’t at all.. Semina’s grave was vandalisedThe family was not left to grieve in peace.”The day after her funeral, somebody put out on Snapchat – which was a fake account – £10,000 for somebody to video and trash Semina’s grave.. And two weeks later, it was [trashed],” they told Sky News.The videos of Semina being bullied and violently attacked – videos showing her being dragged and pushed to the ground and punched and kicked by other girls – were directed at the family on social media following the funeral, as were messages celebrating Semina’s death.Her family say Merseyside Police consistently failed to properly investigate this harassment just as the force failed to properly investigate Semina’s allegation of rape.. Harassment targeting the family”We had Snapchat pictures, edited of her lying in a coffin, or decomposing, sent to us [from] fake accounts, and the police either couldn’t or wouldn’t do anything about it.”The police did say if she had been murdered, then it would have been different because they could have triangulated the signals to the phone to prove that they were near people they suspected of doing it, but they couldn’t do that because it wasn’t a serious crime,” Clare told Sky News.”The police failings are absolutely disgusting,” said Rachel, who blamed “the perpetrator, his family, Merseyside Police, and social services”.”Everybody who is paid to safeguard her let her down.. Police issues with digital investigationsRachel and Clare Halliwell contacted Sky News following our investigation into police failings in the case of Abdul Elahi, a prolific online sexual predator who targeted girls and vulnerable women.More than a dozen victims had reported him to their local forces, but none of those reports were pursued until after Elahi was identified by the FBI investigating the blackmailing of a 15-year-old girl in the US.Instead, according to multiple victims, British police gave them the impression that it was they who were to blame for being extorted into sending intimate images of themselves.Officers also incorrectly told the girls and women that they could not obtain any evidence from the digital platforms Elahi had used to extort and blackmail them.A study from the University of Suffolk in 2018 warned there was “an urgent need for training across police forces” – as fewer than a fifth of police force members knew how to collect evidence from technology companies.Semina Halliwell’s family said Merseyside Police responded similarly regarding the harassment of the family and Semina over Snapchat, and they do not believe the police sought any data from the company as evidence.. According to Rachel, the police “tried to justify their actions – or lack of them – by saying Semina wouldn’t hand the phone over” and countered this by saying Semina had “offered her phone up several times”.Even then, seizing a victim’s phone is not essential to the investigation of these crimes, as stated by national training materials seen by Sky News.One training presentation from the College of Policing advises that “capturing a screenshot of a social media post regarding a hate crime may be sufficient to prove the offence.. Seizure of the device may not necessarily be required”.In the case of Snapchat, although the content of messages is usually automatically deleted after 30 days, the company can retain metadata and potentially content if it receives a request to do so.In its advice for law enforcement, Snap says it can also provide basic subscriber information – potentially including phone numbers and the IP addresses used to log in – as long as police provide a username.According to Europol these two types of evidence are the most important information that investigators can collect during digital investigations, while content data is only the seventh most valuable.Location data, as would have been established by the triangulation methods suggested by officers to Semina’s family, was considered only the eighth most important type of data when investigating digital crimes.Semina’s phone was taken by Merseyside Police following her death and is still in the police’s possession.The family has requested that it be returned to them as it contains images and videos of Semina which are not available elsewhere.. Coroner to hold inquest in due courseA spokesperson for Snapchat was unable to confirm whether the app had received any requests for information from Merseyside Police in Semina’s case.They said: “This situation is devastating and our thoughts are with the family at this difficult time.”Nothing is more important than the safety and wellbeing of our community.. We strictly prohibit bullying, harassment and other types of unwanted contact.””Our global law enforcement operations team supports police investigations, and we have the ability to preserve and provide content to the authorities when we receive requests for assistance,” they added.A spokesperson for Merseyside Police told Sky News it was “not appropriate” for the force “to comment on any of the substantive issues raised at this time, as we would not wish to prejudice the coronial investigation”.”However, we have, and are, co-operating fully with the coroner in this matter,” the spokesperson added.The force declined the opportunity to discuss any of the family’s complaints with Sky News.A spokesperson for the Home Office said: “This is a heartbreaking case and our thoughts are with Semina’s family and loved ones.”No woman or girl should live in fear of violence or sexual abuse and victims should never be denied the justice they deserve.”They added: “This is why we are committed to ensuring more perpetrators face the full force of the law and overhauling our response to rape including increased funding for victim support services.”It is important that the coroner is given the space to reach their conclusions and it would be inappropriate to comment further at this stage.”The senior administrator at the Sefton, St Helens & Knowsley Coroner’s Service told Sky News the initial inquiry was ongoing and a full inquest into Semina’s death would be held in due course.Anyone feeling emotionally distressed or suicidal can call Samaritans for help on 116 123 or email [email protected] in the UK.

The post 3 TSX Stocks That Are Fantastic Deals Right Now appeared first on The Motley Fool Canada.. Caribbean Utilities Company, Ltd. (TSX: CUP.U) ("CUC" or "the Company") announced today its unaudited results for the three and six months ended June 30, 2022 (all dollar amounts are stated in United States dollars).. The post 1 Cheap TSX Dividend Stock to Buy in August and Hold for Decades appeared first on The Motley Fool Canada.. TORONTO — Aecon Group Inc. reported profit fell in its latest quarter, while revenue jumped 16 per cent compared to the second quarter of 2021, as the company navigated broader economic challenges.. The Toronto-based construction company saw a net loss of $6.4 million, or diluted loss per share of 10 cents, for the three months ended June 30, compared to a net profit of $17.6 million, or diluted earnings per share of 27 cents, during the same period in 2021, before adjusting for the impact of the. Companies listed on the London Stock Exchange's premium market have been required since 2021 to make climate-related disclosures to investors in line with the global Taskforce on Climate-related Financial Disclosures (TCFD) - or to explain why they have not.. BEIRUT (AP) — Lebanon appeared Friday to reject claims by the Ukrainian Embassy in Beirut that a Syrian ship docked in a Lebanese port is carrying Ukrainian grain stolen by Russia, following an inspection by Lebanese customs officials.. MOSCOW (Reuters) -Delivery of a Nord Stream 1 gas turbine to Germany from Canada after maintenance was not in line with the contract, Gazprom's senior manager said on Friday, stepping up criticism of manufacturer Siemens Energy.. The post 1 Growth Stock to Allocate More Free Cash Flow to Investors appeared first on The Motley Fool Canada.

In one police interview, as told by Semina’s Mother Rachel, a detective had said to Semina that, “you know, basically, it’s your word against his and do you really want this hanging over your head for 18 months, because it wouldn’t go to court for 18 months to 2 years.” Semina felt discouraged from pressing charges and was made to feel like an inconvenience.. Just one day after laying Semina to rest, an anonymous person, posted on a Snapchat fake account, an offer of the sum of £10,000 to anybody who would trash Semina’s grave and video the event.. According to her family, videos emerged of Semina being bullied and violently attacked, heart-breaking clips showing Semina being dragged, kicked and pushed to the ground by other girls, all of these videos were directed at the family on social media, as were messages celebrating Semina’s death.. Shockingly, her family say, none of these allegations of harassment were investigated, just as Merseyside police force allegedly failed to properly investigate Semina’s rape.. Figures from the National Statistics released in early January 2022, showed that police forces recorded the highest ever number of rapes and sexual offences last year, with 63,136 rapes recorded in the year to September, up 13% from the previous period.. A spokesperson for the Home Office said: “No woman or girl should live in fear of violence or sexual abuse and victims should never be denied the justice they deserve.” However, in the case of Semina, and in the thousands and thousands of rapes each year, in which the numbers are increasing year on year, there is little to no justice.. As an autistic woman and rape survivor, I write this article, to help bring both justice for Semina’s family and long overdue justice for Semina.

Frontline police in the UK are not being taught what evidence they can collect from technology companies, according to training documents obtained by Sky News.. Officers are instructed they need to obtain specialist support or advice to seek evidence in cases involving social media apps and services, but the training has failed to make them aware of how doing so can contribute to an investigation.. The training materials obtained by Sky News reveal that officers are not provided with a list of potential evidence that may be recoverable from online services that are likely to be used in crimes - for instance IP addresses and phone numbers for WhatsApp accounts.. Obtaining an IP address is mentioned during an investigation included in one e-module, but it is cited as an aside when officers already have access to the perpetrator's device - and thus evidence than they had been controlling the social media accounts used in the harassment.. He described the documents as "surprisingly sparse" and said: "They give pointers to what data may be kept in 'the cloud' but for accessing such data officers are asked to rely upon specialist digital investigation officers.. There remain a number of challenges facing police investigations involving collecting evidence from US-based technology companies, including extreme delays in the legal process.. A spokesperson for the College of Policing told Sky News: "The college has recognised the need to further increase digital skills in non-specialist roles and last year launched a new suite of training for all police officers and staff across the country.". The spokesperson for the College of Policing, which asked Sky News not to reproduce the training in full, said: "Our Operation Modify training adds to courses on digital policing already available to non-specialist officers and staff.". The College of Policing spokesperson stated: "All of our courses in this area include specific training on metadata for frontline officers, so that they are able to best support their own and any specialist investigations in these types of cases.". Professor Woodward said: "What is conspicuous by its absence (to a non police officer like me) is how officers should go about investigating online harassment.

A “long-awaited” special education reform plan, commissioned in 2019 , has just been released, and it was immediately slammed as inadequate, despite appropriating $12B more for high needs students and another $3.4B to add more special needs places in mainstream and special schools.. Last year, 1.4 million pupils in England were identified as having special educational needs - the proportion has been growing since 2017.. Teachers and parents today made an urgent call for more money to help fix the “broken” special educational needs system, as the government launched its plan for the future of the provision.. In a long-awaited review of special educational needs and disabilities (SEND ), the government said it will overhaul the system so children receive better help at school from an earlier stage, and includes plans to digitise paperwork.. Surrey County Council is to get a £100million government bailout in exchange for reforming its special educational needs provision.. The council has overspent on its special educational needs and disabilities (Send) budget by a total of £118.4m [$155M] - higher than expected, with a £34.5 million [$45M] overspend in the year 2020/21 alone….. In East Sussex an autistic 7 year old has run away from school 82 times in 15 months, as reported in a piece that painted a dismal picture of handling special education in England. In January 2021, according to support group Special Needs Jungle, 5,600 children and young people with EHCPs were listed as ‘awaiting provision’, with some waiting months, even years, to get the education that they are entitled to.. Among the 2,443 children with ADHD referrals – who have waited an average of 87 weeks for a first appointment – the longest wait stands at 193 weeks or nearly four years.. Despite the unexplained, unstoppable presence of autism in schools across the U.K., members of the media, officials and educators are also calling on the public to “celebrate” “World Autism Acceptance Day” as we’re told in a number of stories.

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